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Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
is yet to come. we will start with the question and answer part. we will start here at jpl. wait for the microphone runner to get to you. we will go in the first row first. state your name and affiliation. >> irish television. could we get times on the major events for the hga deploy and mast. >> i will provide this to you after this. >> if you could talk about the geology. there seems to be three distinct ideological regions. is that the thermal inertia is known as? >> i've been so busy but this mahli -- with this mahli step. you can see the heat shield is on the surface with lots of small creatures. curiosity is on a surface that has a rounded hills and your small creatures. north of curiosity is this leiter toned terrain with lots of basins and pets. if it was up to me i would go to where those three come together. as a starting point. [laughter] you can start to get a flavor of what is going on here. do you want to say anything? >> i just made that up. >> we're going to take another question. it was in the same row but two people to the left. >> hello. i come from france. you
. john blackstone is at jpl in pasadena, california. john, good morning. >> reporter: good morning, jeff. i think we can safely say this morning that the jet propulsion lab is the happiest place on earth. because the "curiosity" over, the car-sized rover, this is just a model, the real thing is safely on the surface of mars. it's such a complex landing that some observers gave the chances of success at no better than 50/50. nobody had ever done anything like this before. and it was all happening 154 million miles away. >> we're just under six minutes to entry. >> in mission control, the tension was obvious as the spacecraft approached mars to begin what was called seven minutes of terror. but with each successful stage of the entry, confidence grew. >> parachute deploy. [ applause ] >> nothing was certain, however, until "curiosity" was confirmed to have landed safely on martian soil. >> touchdown confirmed we are safe on mars. [ cheering ] >> as the celebration began, mission control seemed to lose control. many involved had been working on this mars rover for a decade. >> lift-off. >>
jpl employees on staff. host: kelly from massachusetts on our independent line. caller: you said you are giving companies $1.1 billion. why are we giving them money to reinvent the wheel? we already have the technology to get into space. why aren't we sharing the technology? guest: the companies are using nasa's technology to get into space. the space shuttle was an incredibly capable vehicle, but was not a cheap vehicle. it had a lot capabilities that we did not need. it was a vehicle that was good for lower earth orbits. they build two capabilities to replace it. the other is to go beyond lower earth orbit, but we did do with the apollo program. the space shuttle was a very high-tech vehicle but it wasn't the right vehicle for where we're going now. host: here are some numbers from 2011, looking at contract awards that were given how. host: these funds were given to companies. a question from monty on twitter . guest: the commercial applications can seem far- fetched. if you can find water, water can be turned into fuel that you can use to power a rocket. it can be useful for explo
you. by the question, i think i saw a jpl blog post that rob manning won the bingo game of where it was going to land. curious if there's anything more than accolades with that guess? >> we had multiple bingo games among different groups of people. the biggest one was a giant poster, about 10 feet long, that was printed out. rob was the closest. he was one of what we call our grumlins who operated our readiness testing, so we believe he may have rigged the system somehow. [laughter] >> abbottabad in the room. >> i just wanted a little more information if any of you have it about the already iconic photograph of the parachutes descending with the rover below it. this picture had to be programmed far in advance -- is that right? >> yeah, that is right. we provided the first timing that we wanted this parachute picture to be taken way back in april. targeted for about six minutes after injury. the goal was to make sure that we focus on and if things do not go well. we wanted to see if we saw an inflated parachute or not an inflated parachute to see if there was a damage or not. so t
a bunch of former jpl employees on staff. host: kelly from massachusetts on our independent line. caller: you said you are giving companies $1.1 billion. why are we giving them money to reinvent the wheel? we already have the technology to get into space. why aren't we sharing the technology? guest: the companies are using nasa's technology to get into space. the space shuttle was an incredibly capable vehicle, but was not a cheap vehicle. it had a lot capabilities that we did not need. it was a vehicle that was good for lower earth orbits. they build two capabilities to replace it. the other is to go beyond lower earth orbit, but we did do with the apollo program. the space shuttle was a very high-tech vehicle but it wasn't the right vehicle for where we're going now. host: here are some numbers from 2011, looking at contract awards that were given how. host: these funds were given to companies. a question from monty on twitter. guest: the commercial applications can seem far- fetched. if you can find water, water can be turned into fuel that you can use to power a rocket. it can be use
us do it to request this wee. >> hubert humphrey. on c-span3. >> now nasa engineers at the jpl in california give an update on the mars rover curiosity mission. they talk about the space craft landing on mars earlier this week and show pictures. this is about an hour and 10 minutes. >> welcome to the jp el. we are holding our finalists conference for the week. -- our final conference this we. >> this week, we have had a tremendous success in landing on mars and the beginning of the exploration of a new world. we're going to hear from a senior software engineer who will give us a preview of what's coming up in the next few days for the rover. first, we're going to hear from the descent and landing team. they have been poring over the data and have some new details for us. first, i want to introduce the lead, adam, and his deputy, miguel san martin. >> thank you, veronica. we have a talented panel here for you today. miguel and i wanted to be the ones to introduce them to you. leading off the rotation, the operations lead for descent and landing. from the johnson space flight cen
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)